About Rook

Rook

With its numbered deck of 57 cards, Rook, the classic card game, has elements of everything: bridge, pinochle, and lots of trumping and trick-taking. Includes two “black bird” cards that can change the course of any match. This basic set gives you all you need to get started: the deck and the rules. Great for learning strategy and patience for online play.

We are thrilled to be the complete source of everything you need to know about the rook game. Our goal is simple, provide a place for those looking to find out more about rook, as well as provide a place where those who play a lot of rook can learn and share with others, to hopefully take their game to the next level. If you have a story or a question and would like to share, please visit the rook game forum now.

Learning How to Play the Rook Game

Many people like to play cards, and there are many different games out there to be learned and played. However, for all the games out there, it is very rare for anyone to use anything different than the standard fifty-two card deck. Many people are likely unaware that another type of deck even exists. These people have likely never been introduced to rook playing cards or the rook game.

The rook game uses a deck of fifty-seven cards, which consists of a rook card and four suits of fourteen cards. The game consists of four players divided into two teams of two players each. Cards hold different point totals and each team tries to capture high-value cards from their opponent by tricking them away. Once a team has reached three hundred points, they win.

For people who like games that make them think, they would likely enjoy this game very much. The part they would enjoy the most is the method in which they capture cards away from their opponent. To successfully trick them out of a card, they must out-think or out-wit the person they are up against. It is a game of high concentration, so it is advisable to only play when you are in a frame of mind where you can give it your full attention. Failing to do so could result in a humiliating loss if your opponents are ready to play. As well, if you do not perform well, it can be very embarrassing, as your teammate could become very angry at you for not pulling your weight. Nobody likes to be the one to let down a team.

What separates this game from others is the number of cards used. This can be difficult for some people to adjust to, as the extra card per suit can be deceptively tricky. You may not think it’s a big deal, but if you’ve been conditioned to think of a thirteen-card suit, you may wonder why you can’t quite wrap your mind around this rook game. Of course, if you keep this one thing in mind, it should help you go a long way toward being successful.

Where did the game of Rook come from?

This game was introduced by Parker Brothers in 1905 and has become the card game de rigeur of countless people in the South. Legend says Parker Brothers introduced it to meet the entertainment needs of a the people of the region who swore off “gambling cards” prohibited by their religious faith.

It is very similar to Spades, and Whist, but the number of tricks are unimportant–what is important is capturing as many point cards as possible.

In the century since it was introduced, this card game has endured and for good reason. It is addictive, as players try to get their fix–being the high bidder so you can win the nest and call the trump.

Also, it is the best entertainment value around: by the time the deck has been worn out you have only spent pennies per hour.

And one more thing…. while there are many versions included with the rules, the Kentucky Discard versions seems to be the “standard” Rook games played by most people in Eastern Kentucky.

2 thoughts on “About Rook

  1. Pingback: Are There Professional Rook Players? | Rook Game

  2. Rod Cake

    This is a very popular game on the southern coast of the Burin Peninsula in Nl. Canada
    Can anyone tell me how this game got from Kentucky to NL, ?
    If you travel a short distance from here nobody has ever heard of it

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Sign in with Twitter

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.